5 Everyday Uses for Hydrogen Peroxide

By now, you’ve probably heard of all the effective and inexpensive ways you can clean and disinfect your home with everyday items like vinegar, baking soda, and lemon juice. But hang on a sec, because chances are you have yet another common household item that right now could be helping you tackle the likes of dirt, grime, and germs. It’s that ever-present brown bottle of hydrogen peroxide standing in your medicine cabinet.

Here are 5 ways to put a one dollar bottle of 3% hydrogen peroxide to good use in your home cleaning routine:

1. Add hydrogen peroxide to an opaque spray bottle (exposure to light kills its effectiveness) and spray your cutting board and counter top to get rid of germs and bacteria.  Let it bubble for a few minutes, then scrub and rinse clean.

2. Hydrogen peroxide is non-toxic, which makes it great for areas that store food and dishes, like your refrigerator and dish washer. Spray the inside of the appliance and let it sit for a few minutes before wiping the surface clean.

3. Clean your sponges by soaking them in a 50/50 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and warm water for 10 minutes. Then rinse the sponges thoroughly afterward.

4. Remove baked-on, caked on gunk from pots and pans by rubbing in a paste made from hydrogen peroxide and baking soda. Then scrub with a sponge and some water to help lift the stains off.

5. If your bathtub grout (or caulk) is looking a little dingy, brighten it up with hydrogen peroxide. Dry the tub thoroughly, then spray it liberally with hydrogen peroxide. Let it sit for a while then scrub the grout with an old toothbrush. Repeat the process until the grout is white once again.

If your kitchen or bathroom cleaning chores should call your attention to a leaking toilet or faucet or a clogged drain, well, that’s not a job for hydrogen peroxide, but it’s just right for Connor Plumbing.  There’s no plumbing or drain problem we can’t handle, so call us now for the help you need, when you need it.

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